Thursday, April 20, 2017

Whittier Law School Closing

Happy 4/20 day.

In arguably the first "real" casualty of the law school bubble's burst, the Whittier College Board of Trustees has voted to close Whittier Law School.
We believe we have looked at every realistic option to continue a successful law program. Unfortunately, these efforts did not lead to a desired outcome.

Accordingly, on April 15, 2017 the Board voted not to enroll new 1L classes at the Law School beginning this fall.
The law school leadership is disappointed at their little game being over.
As is well known, the last few years have been extremely difficult for law schools across the country. Whittier Law School felt those challenges keenly and we took significant steps to address them. Sadly, our sponsoring institution opted to abandon the Law School rather than provide the time and resources needed to finish paving the path to ongoing viability and success. We believe this action was unwise, unwarranted, and unfounded.
Apt, as attending Whittier Law School itself has been an "unwise, unwarranted, and unfounded" decision for prospective law school applicants for some time.

According to Law School Transparency, Whittier's 2015 graduating class had an employment score of 19.1%, an underemployment score of 48.9%, and a bar passage rate of 38.1%.  The non-discounted cost of this train-wreck is $284,377.  In 2016, Whittier enrolled a class of 132 with 25-75 LSAT split of 144-149. 

I am not sure Whittier provided a valuable service when it was founded in 1966, but today it is a deadweight piece of foul shit that needed flushing.  Literally everyone in the legal profession - and the clients we represent and that intangible sense of "justice" we supposedly uphold - except Whittier Law School administrators benefits by its closure.

We can debate how many negative-value institutions should close, but few people with any real credibility would defend Whittier's existence.  So let us celebrate this particular domino falling and hope that it is not a one-off loss of faith by a rogue small college.

66 comments:

  1. Good riddance to Shittier, also known (to Old Guy) as Shit-Tier.

    I shall open a bottle of Champagne every time a law school closes. The demise of Indiana Tech has been the best news yet, but the flushing of Shittier is also well worth celebrating.

    Which toilet will be next? Charlotte (Harlotte), Charleston (Charlatan, as someone here styled it), Florida Coastal (Horrida Coastal), and Arizona Summit (Arizona Scum-Pit) are all good candidates. But I'm betting on Appalachian, thanks to its rapidly shrinking enrollment, its remote location, and its shabby outcomes.

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    1. I'm going with LaVerne as the next to close.

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    2. Throwaway AttorneyApril 20, 2017 at 9:50 PM

      Touro....Game's up in New York as well.

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    3. I like Touro's odds. With a risible $14,000,000.00 endowment cash flow has got to be king. This would be consistent with the conviction and imprisonment of a couple of (non-law) faculty members for selling grades, diplomas, references, etc. If the cash flow situation in the law school gets really bad it will not be able to sustain the thing for long other than by raising law school tuition to well beyond insane levels or tuition in all parts of the college to beyond insane levels. Neither approach is likely to end very well.

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    4. I'd suggest Quinnipiac is another candidate. They are TTTrash, they are attached to a parent university with minimal reputation, and they are located in Connecticut. The nearest big cities are Boston and New York, which have far finer schools to recruit from. The local CT legal market is dogshit, and the state isn't exactly a fast-growing economic powerhouse.

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    5. But what Q-U has going for it is this. There are only three law schools in the state. Yale has a national student body and very high standards. That leaves Q-U and UConn. If you can't get into UConn and want to commute your options are pretty much Q-U and Western New England, with WNE being a worse pit. 75% of CT's people live in Hartford, New Haven and Fairfield counties, none of which is commutable to Boston. Some Fairfield folk might be able to commute to the New York area, but not to Columbia or NYU very easily. Anything else around NYC isn't particularly better than Q-U. If you can't get into UConn in-state you ain't getting into Columbia, NYU or any Boston school worth the trouble of relocating and paying heightened living expenses. Q-U is nothing to write home about, but it is a rare law school that filled an existing big gap in a local market rather than just piling on. And while you are right about Connecticut's economy a state with 3.5 million thickly settled people having just two law schools not counting one that could be on Mars for the effect it has on the market is actually pretty exceptional.

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    6. https://www.lstreports.com/schools/quinnipiac/

      Wow, they are truly an epic Failure Factory. Large firm: LESS than 1%. Employment and Uneremployment scores. Few in even public service. Most in small firms which translates into no realistic way to pay off.. $241,064 dollars!!

      Pathetic and a fine example of the Scam.

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    7. OMG:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quinnipiac_University_School_of_Law

      According to Quinnipiac's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 34.5% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required employment nine months after graduation, excluding solo-practitioners.[2]

      -------------------------

      Yeah, but.. but.. they're LAWYERS!!

      Law. Medicine. Nahhhh.. No difference. None at all in lifetime earnings. Don't you believe it!! That degree from the Big Q. is worth $1m easy!!

      Good Lord, this school should be the fucking Mascot for the Scam..

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    8. @5:31

      Quinnipiac's current 1L class is barely over half the size of the 2010 1L class. Also, for the last class that we have data on, 87% of the 1L students were on conditional scholarships. That's a mind-blowing number, even worse than HarloTTTe's 75.6%. Quinnipiac is a school designed to run at standard private school tuition rates, and only 19.5% of the students are paying those rates. That has to be burning a hole through the parent university's wallet. Ultimately, regardless of whether or not prawfs think "the market needs more schools to serve it," if the law school starts to threaten the existence of the parent university, it will get led out into the woods in the middle of the night.

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    9. Stonemason, 5:31 here. I am not here to defend Quinnipiac and I agree with everything you say. But the topic was who will fall next and my point was it will probably not be Quinnipiac regardless of how much it should fall and eventually will.

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    10. Throwaway AttorneyApril 22, 2017 at 5:58 PM

      Very interesting commentary.

      I haven't heard anything about Thomas Jefferson lately. No parent school and a heap of toxic debt still make it a likely candidate as well.

      The reason I still think Touro, though, is that Hofstra and Brooklyn are, or are very close to, letting anyone in now. It used to be Touro was where rich kids with shitty LSATs could get into law school. Now, schools with better pedigrees have taken up that role. Looking at Touro's numbers on LST also reveal a greater than 50% drop in class size, and the school's bar passage rate is pretty bad--not Florida Coastal or Shittier bad, but pretty damn bad.

      At this point, it is a smart move to close up shop before the law school scam starts getting even more mainstream attention as more and more jobless JDs can't pay back their enormous student loan balances.

      Something just tells me that Touro has the business sense to get out while the getting is still good. Once somewhere like Thomas Jefferson collapses under its own weight, it'll start a panic.

      I think we can all agree, though, that the scam's days are numbered.

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    11. Well, I would agree that Q-U probably won't the next school to fall, if only because its parent has an endowment of almost $400 million. Miserable Touro has just $14 million. I don't think Touro could afford to subsidize its law "school" for very long before the entire school went down. For that matter, WNEC only has a $34 million endowment.

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    12. Quinnipiac Law's main competition is WNEU Law. Overall enrollment at QU in all programs is more than double the enrollment at WNEU in all programs and Quinnipiac's endowment is more than ten times the size of WNEU's. A lot of people from Connecticut go to WNEU, which is just over the state line. So my theory is that QU has figured out it has the resources to carry their law school until WNEU Whittiers its law school to stop the bleeding. That will bring all those Connecticut lemmings to QU and make QU an option for the 450,000 people in Springfield, Mass. and its surrounding Hampden County, from which QU is commutable, unlike the remaining Mass. law schools all of which are in the eastern part of the state. Not saying that if they pull it off it would save them in the long run, but as they said in Animal House, it's gotta work better than the truth.

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  2. Now that a few toilet schools have announced their closure, others will have a ready excuse. "Just look at glorious Indiana Tech! That global headquarters of Law & Hip-Hop couldn't survive in this harsh economic climate. We, too, despite our excellence, have had to shut our doors."

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  3. Shittier has called off this autumn's entering class. But presumably it has already admitted lots of people. Nice way to honor its commitments.

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    1. Were they interested in the moral high ground they would have cut an easy transfer deal with another toilet and then shut the whole place down. Existing students would have had they option of getting rid of their loans or plodding on to their doom.

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    2. Those people have dodged a bullet by being denied the opportunity to receive a legal education at $hiTTTTier Law Sewer.

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  4. Hooray! Lets hope the professors all end up homeless, like their graduates!

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  5. I hear Skadden has just leased another 20,000 square feet of prime in NYC to accommodate the faculty, now free from the shackles of sacrifice that is tenure, and finally able to reap the million dollar incomes they were cheated out of by their consciences.

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    1. this is hilarious!

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    2. Aren't they going to build a skyscraper just for their Division of Law & Hip-Hop?

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  7. This news is excellent - I feel bad for the grads who will face further stigma from graduating from a closed law school. Maybe they can play the sympathy card in local government?

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  8. Interesting that the trustees of the parent school pulled the plug on this slag heap law school. Same thing happened at Indiana Tech. Some people have speculated that the stand-alone schools would be the first to go since they don’t have a parent university covering their losses. However, it looks like the most vulnerable schools are money losers which are attached to universities that get tired of all the red ink. These universities might also be concerned about their overall reputations being damaged by the poor quality of their law schools (Whittier had a 22% pass rate on the Cal Bar last year). Meanwhile, the stand-along schools have managed to keep the lights on, even places like Appalachian, whose sole purpose seems to be providing a salary to a dwindling number of employees.

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    1. Consider the nail hit on the head, and I will suggest a further refinement. Whittier has only about 1,700 undergraduates and not too many non-law school graduates. How much can they afford to divert to keeping a sinking ship afloat. But yes, as a free-standing school they'd have no doubt just kept on truckin's until (apologies to Don McLean) "when no hope was left in sight, on that staryy, starry night, they closed the dump as scamsters rarely do . . ."

      But now here's a more intriguing question. Not-for-profit stand-alones exist to provide a living to the people who run them. For-profits exist to provide a return to investors. I would imagine that infilaw has recovered all of its investment and that the people who own it don't care a rat's ass about what happens to the faculty. Who is likely to hold out longer? The NFPs or the FPs?

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  9. But, but, but, wait...Whittier law professor Sheldon Lyke thoroughly trounced LST's arguments in December 2015, in that schools like Whittier should be celebrated for providing low-LSAT scores students entre to the legal profession. Clearly, the decision of the parent university must be in error...

    http://www.thefacultylounge.org/2015/12/adding-clarity-to-law-school-transparency.html

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  10. Old Guy, organizations exists to perpetuate themselves. An organization will only close when its continued existence threatens a the existence of a larger organization with the power to close it.

    So, in addition to the ones you mentioned, the next ones might be struggling private law schools that are a part of small private colleges, just like Whittier and Hamline were. Perhaps Elon, Faulkner, Northern Ohio, Concordia, or ....?

    You all would know what such schools are better than me.

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  11. Happy 4/20 indeed :D

    Hopefully more schools close before the next stoner holiday. I really wish someone would take pictures of the faculty so we can make some solid memes.

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  12. See this statement made four years ago during a promotional video by scam-dean Penelope Bryan, whom Shittier was paying more than $400k per year:

    "Any student, no matter what you're trying to accomplish or what you're trying to become, is very well served by this law school."

    http://outsidethelawschoolscam.blogspot.ca/2013/04/the-two-faces-of-whittier-law-dean.html

    Well, Penny (named after the value of your toilet school's degree), let's suppose that a student hypothetically might have in mind to become—oh, a lawyer, and might be trying to establish a remunerative career in law. Well, Law School Transparency gives Shittier an employment score of only 19.1%:

    https://www.lstreports.com/schools/whittier/

    Fully 27.7% of Shittier shitlings from the (cl)ass of 2015 were "Non-Employed" ten months after graduation. That's several times the unemployment rate for the general public, most of which doesn't drop almost $300k (plus $200k in interest) on a worthless law degree from Shittier. Only 25.5% were in positions allegedly requiring admission to a bar. The dubious category of "JD Advantage" accounted for 28.4% of graduates. The toilet school itself employed 9.9%.

    As for salaries, only 41.1% of the group that was not "Non-Employed" provided information. (The salary for the "Non-Employed", of course, was zero.) The median salary was $52,500; the salary at the 75th percentile was $65,000. It seems clear that the ones paid by the school did not report salaries at that level, and I suspect that the "JD Advantage" crowd also is poorly represented in these data.

    Even so, consider the cost of attendance if fully financed by student loans (and it's worth noting that 43.4% of the class paid full price). Law School Transparency reports that debt at the time when repayment is scheduled to start would stand at $284,377. Even if stretched out over 20 years, that would come to $2,048 per month—nearly $25,000 a year in payments. Deduct that from an optimistic salary of $52,500 or even $65,000 before taxes and see how much is left for such luxuries as housing and food, never mind savings for retirement.

    In short, when she said that "[a]ny student ... is very well served by this law school", Penelope Lyin' was talking out of her ass. Surprise!

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  13. @ 7:53: Add Valpo to your list. A school run by a small private university with a modest endowment. The law school's raison d'etre is to push money to the central administration and the formula worked well for decades, but it's not working anymore.

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  14. I disagree with LSTC's characterization of the news as "this particular domino falling". In the classic domino scenario, the fall of one domino directly pushes other dominos down. Here, to the contrary, one law school's closing will not directly cause others to close. It may even encourage some to stay open, as the over-supply of law school seats in a particular market niche is reduced. Thus, I would hold off the celebrations until an appropriately large event affecting law schools generally occurs, such as the U.S. Department of Education stepping in to restrict or (better yet stop altogether) further lending to law students.

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    1. Every death of a law school gives cause for celebration. Come to my place tomorrow for Champagne.

      Maybe the disappearance of a few will strengthen the survivors. Or maybe it will sow doubt among prospective law students and also facilitate the closure of other law schools.

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  15. California allows grads of non-ABA schools to be admitted to the bar, which brings into play an even lower tier than the lowest tiers of schools in other states. Some CA schools are as minimal as they come in footprint and structure.

    When the homeschooling movement began a couple of decades ago, it was under siege legally and a significant number of CA homeschooled kids set their sights on becoming CA admitted lawyers. The would do the minimum requirement of two years of undergrad, do law school at one of several small cheap unaccredited CA law schools, take the CA baby bar a year in, and take the CA bar on graduation.

    Generally no firm would hire the grads from schools nobody ever heard of, so the would go solo or work in networks or firms started by their fellows.

    Interestingly, many are doing quite well. Tuition was only $3,000 a year or so. One year one such unknown school had the third highest passage rate for the full CA bar exam of any schools in the nation. The schools could never qualify for student loan money, so everyone graduated debt free. Never being hired by any firm meant never being fired, but instead building up ones own business over years. Some have developed into superb trial attorneys who routinely take down the big boys in jury trials. Probably the single most formidable trial lawyer I ever encountered had a law degree from a correspondence school. School rank is not everything.

    Success in law, much as posited by the infamous Bell Curve book, is a function of IQ and not necessarily schooling. Top tier schools attract more top IQs and it can be difficult to determine whether their success is due to educational excellence rather than raw IQ of the students. The Bell Curve tends to suggest that income correlates with IQ regardless of education.

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    1. "Success in law, much as posited by the infamous Bell Curve book, is a function of IQ"

      Success in law is a function of being above a certain intelligence point and having the right opportunity/experience. Marginal increases in IQ above the level of competence are overrated. (Note that no one in law hires on intelligence.)

      That one went to Cal and is spit out of Latham Watkins after five years with minimal transferable skill and another goes to Golden Gate and becomes a thriving civil attorney means absolutely nothing as to their respective IQs. I would imagine the Cal grad (and many T-14 graduates) would thrive in the alternate universe where they clerk or intern with the right hustling small firm and learn how to work cases at the ground level in actual courtrooms instead of doing the typical work of BigLaw associates.

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    2. "Success in law, much as posited by the infamous Bell Curve book, is a function of IQ and not necessarily schooling."

      I'd say that a certain minimum level of IQ is required to practice competently and that higher IQ correlates with increased skill and usefulness at law practice.... but competence isn't correlated with success in law these days. The limiting factor is sales ability. Lots of very sharp people end up getting fed through the biglaw meat grinder and emerge as impoverished shitlaw attorneys. Likewise, many people who have the litigation skills of a monkey thrive because their ability to put butts in the waiting room exceeds the reputational damage their incompetence causes.

      As for the claim that schooling isn't the determinant... no shit- the value of a JD has been utterly eroded by years of giving them out to everyone with a pulse. And since even an elite school doesn't screen for the ability to generate billables, it's also no guarantee of success.

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    3. 12:41 PM, I'm poor, so I must also be stupid.

      But hey, being stupid and poor is better than being a jerk. :)

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  16. Let's hope this is the first of many!

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  17. Idiot Whittier students screech at Trustees

    Courtesy of ATL
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hMGoUXR3EUA

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    1. That was pretty bizarre; they should have been beggining the trustees to close the place immediately so they can discharge their student loans. Several of those yelling at the trustees noted that they had $200K in debt. So they should have been angry-that the school was going to remain open for two more years.

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    2. Remember, these students were admitted in 2016, 2015, 0r 2014 for the 3Ls. The Scam was well-documented, and they either couldn't be bothered to Google "Law School" or they willfully ignored all the evidence.... no sympathy here.

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    3. That video was pure gold. A bunch of dumb snowflakes who wouldn't know what time it was if someone rammed a clock tower up their ass.

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    4. I was shocked that none of those poor stupid kids requested the opportunity to withdraw and receive a refund for all tuition money spent or expedited closure to facilitate student loan discharge. The irrelevant, if angry, questions they posed amply supports the Trustees lack of confidence in their ability to pass the bar and get law jobs.

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    5. From the NYT announcement, at least, it sounds like the closure will be soon. Whittier is not promising that the law school will remain open until currently-enrolled students complete their JDs. Rather, that the school will "find a way for those already enrolled to finish their education." So perhaps the school's plan is to work with the many, many other law schools in California to ensure that all enrolled students who wish will be accepted elsewhere as transfers.

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    6. Emissary: Soldiers, it is painfully apparent that this war is a gruesome and futile mess. In the name of both prudence and humanity, the leadership will henceforth decline to sacrifice your lives on the altar of exploitation and greed.

      Soldiers (angrily): We DEMAND that you continue to enrich yourselves by squandering our lives. It is the only way to feed our much-cherished vanity and delusions. Your terse and hurtful announcement proves that you do not care about us.

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    7. Jesus, that overpaid dolt can't even be bothered to put on a tie.

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    8. "REEEEEEE, SHUT UP AND WASTE MORE OF MY MONEY! I DON'T WANNA GET CLOSED-SCHOOL DEBT FORGIVENESS, I WANT TO BE A MILLION-DOLLAR TOILETEER!"

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  18. That Youtube video says it all.

    I can only hope that the same thing happens at least two of the law schools in my city.

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  19. Feed fat, ye locusts, feed!
    And, in your tasselled pulpits, thank the Lord
    That, from the toiling bondman's utter need,
    Ye pile your own full board.
    How long, O Lord! how long
    Shall such a priesthood barter truth away,
    And in Thy name, for robbery and wrong,
    At Thy own altars pray?

    ——John Greenleaf Whittier (no relation)

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    1. Hickory, dickory, dock
      It's daft to run-out the Clock
      With jobs being so few, for a One Twenty-Two
      They'll dump your ass on the next block

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    2. The job stats could hardly be shittier,
      And the passage rates kept getting grittier,
      The profs sat on their asses,
      While screwing the masses,
      So goodbye to lousy old Whittier.

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  20. Watching that video, I have to say this really shoots down the "sophisticated consumers" argument that the courts adopted in some of the lawsuits brought against the law schools.

    In no way would I label any of these nitwits "sophisticated"..

    In response to Dybbuk, I would point out that to qualify for a closed school discharge you must be enrolled at the time your school closes and you do not complete the program because of the closure. So, nobody should withdraw. The obvious best move is for everyone to immediately request a closed school discharge and begin the process once the closure officially takes place. This, unfortunately, will probably not help any 3L's but will help 1L and 2L's. The last class standing will be the one that gets completely screwed, of course.

    That said, I doubt these "sophisticated consumers" even know about the opportunity for a closed school discharge. They seem to have completely drunk the Kool-Aid and are at the level of "law = $1m lifetime earnings", "law = prestige", "law = secure well-paying jobs and lifetime middle / upper-middle class earnings and lifestyle".

    None of which are true except for a very, very small few.

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    1. You can drop out up to 120 days before the school closure and still qualify for student loan discharge.

      https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/repay-loans/forgiveness-cancellation/closed-school

      While I commend this closure decision, it is really disgraceful that Whittier failed to announce the effective date.

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    2. Okay, I see that. But we don't know the effective date so at this point, no one can withdraw safely. They may shut down soon or not so soon. As you say, there is no effective date of closure at this time.

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  21. These students screwed themselves when they bought into their parents' ideal of the law as being prestigious, and law school as being a ticket to reach that destination.

    Getting mad at the trustees for closing down this dumpster fire is like the victims of the a plane crash blaming Sir Issac Newton for discovering gravity.

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  22. It's a long way from 2014. Seems like 2014 is long-gone and it was only 3 short years until this closure:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8IlW5ifl1A

    *Who* will save the die kinder now without the Children's Rights Clinic? And - NO MORE Twister?!?

    No more Dean with puppies. Gone. All gone..

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  23. Harvard Law School tuition and fees for the 2017-18 is about $63,000. This does not include book expenses or living expenses in the pricey Boston/Cambridge area.

    Paying sticker,YOU CAN EASILY EXPECT TO WALK-OUT OF THERE 300,000 in the hole. Think about that.

    You will essentially need to do Big Law or get a top notch consulting or Wall Street gig to be able to pay that down.

    Yikes

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    1. Insane. The way I see it, those who are Legacies at Harvard Law and come from money, probably upwards of 40+% are still and forever will be in a very different class - and yes, America is all about class - than the rest.

      Someone who gets in on merit and does, as you say, pay full sticker may do well enough to pay off their debt and have a good, lifetime career of above-average earnings but I would not want to be in that position.

      As I've found out, only suckers take risks. I don't do anything anymore unless it's a virtual guarantee.

      Coming out of HYS at full sticker is not. Good odds, yes. But not a guarantee.

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    3. Yes, 4:09 is right. Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Columbia—these are the preserves of the rich. Those of us from undistinguished class backgrounds don't belong there. I know from experience.

      But don't suppose that Harvard is uncommonly expensive. The odious Shittier costs 85% as much as Harvard.

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  24. The Idiots are friggin' protesting!

    http://www.whittierdailynews.com/social-affairs/20170421/dozens-of-angry-whittier-law-school-students-protest-after-college-announces-closure

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    1. Idiots?

      This place is still a Cash Machine even at current levels of enrollment - eh.. except for *one* small thing. And that is:

      http://www.eri-nonprofit-salaries.com/?FuseAction=NPO.Summary&EIN=951644048&BMF=1&Cobrandid=0&Syndicate=No

      Take a look at the most recent Form 990 (2014).

      Scroll through the form. Take note of the listed salaries of some of the professors. At roughly $200 grand a pop, even 135 or so enrolled students paying $45 grand a pop goes quickly.

      The faculty and admin. list goes on for 11 pages or so on their website.

      Frankly, way, way too much bloat for such a small *unranked* law skool..

      So yes.. They are idiots. Supreme Idiots at that.

      As Nando and others have stated: Law schools aren't run for the benefit of the students. Rather, they are run for the benefit of faculty and staff. And $200k plus gold-plated pensions - roughly 17 grand per *month* - is a lot of "benefit".

      The Trustees are doing the right thing. I would guess they see trouble down the road with the ABA, due to the ridiculously low Bar passage and employment rates, as well as they seem to understand that 2010 and before - when law school enrollments were double (think the Housing Market just before the Bust..) those years aren't coming back.

      We've reached a critical tipping point where tuition is just "a little too much" plus the internet getting the word out on college and law school, etc. plus general economic uncertainty and technological changes lowering the demand for *all* jobs, etc.

      The Glory Days aren't coming back for Higher Education and I think, maybe, the Trustees see this which is why they commenced with the sale of the land and now this shutdown.

      Protesting. Yeah, these Lemmings are "special" alright. A Special Brand of Idiot..

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  25. Hi again, everyone! Sorry I'm so late to this party, but I saw the good news and wanted to chip in as well.

    CONGRATULATIONS TO THE SCAM BLOG MOVEMENT! You guys deserve all the credit and praise you get.

    Hopefully, any 1Ls and 2Ls will know about that loophole to get all their debt discharged and move on with their lives and can use it... but then again, if they were dumb enough to go to a lower-tier trash heap like Whittier, then that might be asking too much of them. Some people are just beyond saving, and sadly, you can't save those who don't want to be saved.

    Oh, and someone get a list of the faculty so we can see where they all end up! You think maybe they'll end up all set for life at some Biglaw firm? AHAHAHAHAHAHAHA...

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    1. Toileteers have shown time and time again that they want to finish their Mickey Mouse law degrees rather than getting their debt discharged.

      As for jobs for the profe$$ors, Dougie Fresh won't get the chance to set up a Department of Hip-Hop at Shittier...

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  26. So, which school will go next? Now I just want to quote the tag line from the trailers of a recent game before it launched: "WHO'S NEXT?"
    https://youtu.be/Ci6lMQNLKZU
    https://youtu.be/1EROmqidZQc
    (NOTE: You may need to sign in to view these trailers. But hey, just imagine it being the law pigs getting beaten up...)

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  27. as i said like 50 times before
    1. get rid of the LSAT
    2. move the curriculum online
    3. lower the cost down the $5,000

    If I can get a MS Accounting online and be a CPA, I should have the same opportunity to be an attorney (so that I can be a tax attorney). Fuck these ABA fat cats.

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