Tuesday, November 5, 2013

Oppressed People of Color named Nancy Leong

I hope I don't get this site in trouble, but I got this leaked (hacked?) email from our quandam friend and law review article champion, Nancy Leong, Professor of Law and specialist in POCNNL studies (People of Color named Nancy Leong). Earlier, she went on record stating that it was a miracle that the "mostly white, male" establishment allowed a "person of color" to publish her devastatingly powerful law review article, Racial Capitalism, which aims to protect POCNNL against the "legal establishment" (which she is, as a POCNNL, not part of). 

Also, she specializing in the most important issue facing us today as law students, attorneys (employed or not), professors, administrators, and the public: the need for more law review articles.
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From: Leong, Nancy (NLeong@law.du.edu)
To: L*****, B**** [censored for privacy reasons]
Subject: Re: Scumbloggers dispute

Greetings & salutations again B****,

I just wanted to know if you are following up on that recent comment (Aug 11, 2012 8:14:41 PM) I wrote defending the need for more law review articles and their importance in modern legal jurisprudence. I gave the scumbloggers hell on that, and I know you agree with me, by default, since you above all know which side our bread is buttered most. I ignored their puerile comments entirely, as we should do whenever it is possible to ignore oppression—I'm not sure what else we can do about it at the moment. Some oppression of POCNNL is to be expected from time to time. 

I also know you helped encourage me in my masterpiece (you called it so, not me!), The Open Restrooms at the Trucker's Rest Stop: Narratives and Intimate Encounters of the American Long-Haul Dream; also my tour-de-force (you called it so again!), How to do things with Women's words, as opposed to other words that others might use (besides women), [note: Leong actually delivered this under an abbreviated title at the "Symposium Honoring the Work of Professor Ann Scales", at the University of Denver School of Law on March 30, 2013]; and Racial Capitalism: How society profits by exploiting People of Color named Nancy Leong (POCNNL) and what we as a society can do to prevent it and give Nancy Leong a full professorship immediately

(I don't know why you told me not to use the whole subtitle, it is long but thoroughly (and professionally) clarifying.) 

You also know, and I am sure you remember well, my earlier presentation of The Persistent Gender Disparity in Student Note Publication which I gave in Denver. I still must admit that it disappoints me greatly but even now, besides my own work, nothing has changed in the quality of our in-house contributors, both student and faculty. 

Really I am still disappointed in how POCNNL studies have only slowly caught on fire; honestly, for reasons not entirely known to me, they only really fascinate my own 1L students (before grades come out; afterwards I lose much of my audience—ADD generation again, I suppose). Here is my latest copy, I hope you will proofread the synopsis again for my second edition of "Racial Capitalism", which I have been generously asked to submit for this summer's edition of our own law review, Havard passing on its republication:

Oppression of People of Color named Nancy Leong (POCNNL) has serious negative consequences both for Nancy Leong and for society as a whole. The process of exploiting POCNNL relies upon and reinforces commodification of racial/NL identity, thereby degrading that identity by reducing it to another thing to be bought and sold. Commodification can also foster racial/NL resentment by causing non-white people (if named Nancy Leong) to feel used or exploited by those not named Nancy Leong. The superficial process of assigning monetary value to POCNNL within a system of racial/non-NL capitalism displaces measures that would lead to meaningful social reform. To conclude, in an idealized society, oppression of POCNNL will no longer occur.

Catch ya lata alligata, 
POCNNL

24 comments:

  1. Even her emails are a study in the power and importance of legal scholarship. Wonderful stuff Nancy, and so modest!

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    1. Yeah, pretty sure this is a parody, dude.

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    2. Yeah, pretty sure you missed the sarcasm, man.

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  2. Maybe L*****, M****** (censored for privacy reasons) could compose a poem about Ms. Leong.

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    1. Good thinking censoring for privacy reason. B**** would sue you for mentioning his brother's name here.

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    2. Maurice is a pseudonym, and anyone can use it.

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    3. Some people call me the Space Cowboy . . .

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  3. http://www.law.du.edu/index.php/profile/nancy-leong

    Good way to play up the minority card, especially for someone who appears to be white. Get a life, cockroach.

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    1. She appears to be not just white, but rich and white. She provides us a very informative case study in the commodification, market positioning, and distribution of academic prestige.

      In other words, if she inherited access to the requisite funding for Northwestern and Stanford degrees, she may appear to be more studious and informed than she is in fact. Of course, when anyone reads her atrocious writing, appearances don't matter any more.

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  4. We are all Nancy Leong.

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  5. That's rich, Nancy Leong advocates "dismantling racial capitalism", when she is in fact a well-rewarded beneficiary of that system. I wouldn't be surprised if the main reason she got into Stanford Law School (as opposed to, say, Duke, Penn or Cornell) was because she was a female minority, and probably she got her prof position was because she went to Stanford (as opposed to Duke, Penn, Cornell or elsewhere) and is a female minority. The main reason her articles get published is because they are on politically-correct topics of "racial oppression", rather than real legal subjects like criminal or civil procedure.
    In her private life she marries a white guy and pastes their photo on the wedding announcement page of the New York Times, which is a plea for acceptance by the white monied upper-class society-types.
    She gets my vote for the Clarence Thomas Affirmative Action Hypocrisy award for 2013.

    Leong is a Chinese name. Apparently there are something like 1.1 billion Chinese in the world, which makes them the largest racial group in the world. I imagine there are at least 2 billion Asians in the world. Why are Chinese considered a minority, and why should a Chinese person be the best spokesperson for minorities in this country? Sure, there was a small group of Chinese who -- willingly -- came to America in the late 1800's (mainly to work as manual workers, mainly on the railroads) and they were not treated very nicely by the dominant white society. But their experience was nothing like the terrible cruelty visited upon Blacks and American Indians.
    If Nancy Leong believes in racial justice, why doesn't she give up her prof job and hand it to a deserving minority, someone who is black, American Indian, Hmong, Australian Aboriginal, native Hawaiian, or a descendant of the Japanese Nissei? She could easily get a job as an English teacher at a high school, or with a bit of luck, at a community college, if she went back to school and got a real Ph.D.

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    1. The Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 was the first legal doctrine in the US to limit immigration from a certain racial group (no one from China can gain US citizenship, only lifted in WWII), and the experience of Chinese workers in the era is far worse than what you imply in "nothing like the others", at least in my history book. Indeed one can argue the whole idea against Asian people in general started with that, at least on a federal, legal level.

      Also, it's insincere to say the least to mix up a racial group's world representation and its history & experience in the US (or any other country). Those two are not the same thing.

      Finally, only because someone in a racial group does something less than honorable, doesn't mean she represents the whole group. Even the argument that Chinese or Asians fare better economically in the US than some other minorities doesn't point to the lack of racism (or even comparatively lack of it comparable to other groups). California & Academia may be one of the few combinations where such racism is less pronounced, not so in many other places across the US.

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    2. This comment is exactly why this blog's "movement" hasn't gained more traction. Without a shred of evidence whatsoever, the commenter spews out racially tinged accusations that Leong is not only overpaid, not only under qualified, not only doing a disservice with her insipid law review articles... but she affirmative-auctioned herself into Stanford law school.

      This is just stupid, and not really worth responding to, which makes one wonder how many readers conclude that your arguments lack credibility. Many Asian-Americans I know have standardized test scores and GPAs that blow the living shit out of what white students accomplish. The stereotype offered by this moron is nowhere close to reality. It's far more likely that he is bitter and jealous. Which is unfortunate, because I've probably agreed with him on every single point he's considered about Leong, until he made this one.

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    3. This is excellent and spot on.

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  6. I appreciated the creative characterization of Harvard as "Havard," but being a white hegemonist, I prefer the more in-your-face "Hahvahd." See to it that my preferences are accommodated in the future.

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  7. Now wait a minute. That nasty economic system provides that everyone gets to buy mass-produced goods, doesn't it? Do you think those Fritos and Twinkies enjoy the process of commodification?

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    1. I'm pretty sure that the proper word for that is "commoditization." Be very cautious about imitating an ignorant but ambitious poseur from the University of Denver.

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  8. I can imagine her wearing a pink hoodie, just to prove how oppressed she is.

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  9. Performing the arduous task of finding, reading, and deconstructing Professor N's boring and pretentious work makes our contributor P a better academic than 99.8% of the scamprofs out there. This forum has become a nexus of creative and incisive thought, which terrifies the parasites without end.

    Keep up the good work, guys. You're smarter than the scamprofs.

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  10. Can someone speak plainly?

    Or lay it all out in simple writing and for any layman to understand?

    All I get out of all of this is that there is an obscure Nancy Leong who is not favored here and implicitly disliked, and also a lot of insider quibbling and for a select group of esoteric readers.

    Anyway, the debate seems to boil down to when a commenter uses the word: "poseur" because that implies a generally understood club of aligned thinkers known as OLSS who are in turn aligned with, though they may not know it consciously, with the general mindset of overall Legal academia.

    Hardly the bedrock upon which an ideological or political movement will build.

    As my evidence for the above I will give you the Campos toe in the waters and the eventual Campos crap out.


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    1. Your understanding of the word "poseur" is deficient, and you're a pathetic writer besides. That's a characteristic you share with a certain Denver professor, who gets overpaid to write garbage, which burdens her students with sickening amounts of debt.

      Other than that, you're an idiot.

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  11. In "The Open Road and the Traffic Stop: Narratives and Counter-Narratives of the American Dream," 64 Fla L.Rev. 305, 349 (2012), Leong writes: "The infinite potential represented by the open road is truly both infinite and potential."

    Prof. Leong's repeated repetitions are truly both repeated and repetitious. And her tautologies are truly tautological.

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    1. Oh, and thanks for another brilliant and hilarious post, Preston Bell.

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    2. Imagining the Open ToadNovember 7, 2013 at 11:28 AM

      (re-posted from last week)



      For those of you who enjoyed dybbuk's hilarious take on Professor Leong's "The Open Road", you should seriously consider yet another UF law review article it spawned, called "Imagining The Open Road" by Brooks Holland, who at the time (and maybe now, for all I know) was a VAP at Gonzaga.

      If you want a preview of his opinion of her paper, here's the spoiler. And man, is it spoiled rotten.

      "I embrace the Open Road, not only as high-level scholarship, but as a virtue in legal education.".

      Seriously? Wow.

      http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2201211&download=yes

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