Thursday, March 1, 2018

Finally, a minimum LSAT score—of sorts

North Carolina Central University may be the first institution to impose a minimum LSAT score for admissions. Aspirants to this toilet school will now have to score 142 or better. In other words, the bottom 18% of the pool of test-takers just isn't good enough for North Carolina Central.

This departure from the institution's "holistic approach to admissions", according to scam-dean Phyliss Craig-Taylor, results from a "communication from the ABA" about violations of various standards. Faced with loss of accreditation, North Carolina Central had to adopt "new strategies and approaches … to be achieve [sic] student success".

Any minimum is better than none, but 142 is so dreadfully low as to lose its significance. If the threshold were set at a reasonable level, such as 160, North Carolina Central and most other law schools would cease to exist.

14 comments:

  1. According to the previous post on OTLSS, the 142 LSAT is about a 60% bar pass rate. Shoot for the moon, land among the stars, or some drivel like that...let’s hear it for the law school cartel!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I dunno, Old Guy. I got x>160, and I'm pretty sure I'm still an idiot who shouldn't have been let into any law school.

    Seriously, though, I guess this means they were letting in sub-142s before? Now, everybody deserves a place in this world. I really believe that. But surely we can find some better place for functional illiterates than the law, can't we?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This year at least a quarter of the entering class at North Carolina Central scored 142 or lower.

      Delete
  3. In a similar way, some colleges no longer require SAT's or ACT's or their equivalent. It's basically just open admission. The only requirement is that you pay the insanely high tuition. As a lawyer from a family of educated professionals, all of this makes me very sad. Higher education has been wholly de-valued, and will be rendered irrelevant if things go on like this much longer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I question what value it ever had in the first place. We are all highly educated here, many of us having been in rather prestigious institutions and gifted programs etc. throughout our schooling.

      But aside from giving pretentious academics a captive audience and an inflated sense of self worth, what exactly has all this education accomplished?

      Were our grade school or less educated fore bearers really inferior, mindless savages as academics insist? Had they really accomplished nothing?

      Or did they perhaps accomplish more than virtually anyone does today, and didn't they build our country and the infrastructure?

      The difference is our ancestors were so active and so intelligent that they created such an immense surplus that future generations could be carried into the state we are now, where idle educators and students could waste away their lives with worthless sophistry and makework, because survival is guaranteed and life is so comfortable.

      When I look at Venezuela now, they are not any less educated. There are so many white collar highly educated professionals reduced to a pitiful state. Because somewhere the supply chain for food and power and everything else fell apart. And it's worrying that could happen to use too, everything is so fragile.

      Delete
    2. Education is achieved, if at all, by oneself. It cannot be purchased from or dispensed by even the worthiest of institutions.

      The equation of diplomas and education is a vulgar misconception promoted by hackademia and its dupes. A diploma attests to little more than payment of fees; it certainly does not prove education. Yet the notion prevails that "an education" is achieved invariably, and uniquely, upon completion of the eighth semester at an establishment calling itself a college or a university.

      Delete
    3. What nonsense. College gives a student an opportunity to grow and open their minds. Yes of course we all self teach ourselves by doing the reading, writing and thinking. What education does not do, necessarily, is prepare one for a job.

      Delete
    4. Thank you for dismissing my thoughts as "nonsense" while giving an irrelevant justification.

      Delete
  4. Mind you, those intrepid souls who surpass North Carolina Central's threshold of 142 can look forward to these outcomes ten months after graduation (derived from the data for the graduates of 2016):

    One chance in three of unemployment
    One chance in six of short-term or part-time employment, not necessarily in law
    One chance in five of working for a small law firm
    No chance whatsoever of Big Law or a federal clerkship

    That can be theirs for the low price of $41k per year, not counting living expenses. In educational jargon, this is called an "opportunity".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. But Old Guy, there will be a shortage of lawyers due to all the retiring baby boomers. Plus, 2016, er 2017, no 2018 will finally be the year that there is a shortage of law graduates! Our courts are clogged with pro se litigants who can’t find a lawyer. And if a grad can’t get a job filling the ‘justice gap’, they can get a JD ‘advantage job’ working as a party planner, excuse me a corporate compliance officer. Oh, who are we fooling. We know there is no future for most elite grads like us beyond big law. We don’t want to deal with clients in a struggling solo practice. We just want to work from about 10 AM to 2 PM, with an hour for lunch, while making a sweet six figure salary. Give us a break for once and let us keep living off the Federal student loan gravy train.

      Yours truly,
      Law profs

      Delete
  5. Way off topic, but I just noticed that Third Tier Reality is offline. This is a shame and I can't understand why.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Just a guess, but maybe Nando wanted to make a clean break (psychologically). I can understand that.

      Delete
    2. He did great work-but also just a guess-at some point exhaustion sets in. The facts are out there, and Nando did a great job trying to get the facts out to the 0Ls, but other than a couple of schools here and there, the country still has about 100+ too many laws schools, annually fattening the profs and dumping thousands more JDs onto a saturated market. Frankly, it's amazing he lasted as long as he did. It defies belief that the scam is still going, but it is and it doesn't appear it will end any time soon.

      Delete
  6. His clarification of having an arrangement to begin yet not a similar arrangement for the complete, Best LSAT Book Review

    ReplyDelete